What we’ve learned about 2019

What a year 2018 has been! Just 52 weeks ago we started writing this newsletter to capture what’s changing in the world. Our aim was – and still is – to help you make sense of tomorrow and prepare yourself and your organization accordingly. Luckily for us, 2018 was a fascinating year to write about. But, as you will know by now, we don’t like to dwell on the past, we're all about tomorrow and that’s why we want to think about 2019. What an even more fascinating year it will be.

What’s changing: Friday, 14th December, 2018

While we are waiting for our beloved flying cars to appear, transportation in 2019 will be defined by micro trips and polarizing e-scooters. (4 min read)

BONUS: Top transport designs in 2018 (6 min read)

 

We’ll know a lot about our babies even before they are born. (3 min read)

BONUS: The most incredible scientific discoveries of 2018. (7 min read)

 

We’ll continue to obsess over the “humans vs robots” paradigm. (5 min read)

BONUS: There will be an economic recession in 2019.  (7 min read)

 

What’s popular and trendy will continue to be random and impossible to predict. (4 min and many wonderful hours)

BONUS: Unless you are Disney, in which case, it’s easy to imagine the future. (4 min read)

BONUS II: Google’s year in search. And why many of use never stopping searching (2 min video and 8 min read)

 

The big 4 (Amazon, Google, Apple and Facebook) are under considerable scrutiny. (3 min read) So much so, that perhaps in 2019 they won’t be the biggest or the most innovative companies in our lives. (6 min read and 5 min read)

BONUS: Look for cashierless done right here. (4 min read)

 

Artificial intelligence (AI) will be everywhere, but wait for GANs to bring true innovation. (7 min read)

BONUS: 2019 might be too late to start your AI projects. (6 min read)

 

Just because we love, love, love books, here’s the ultimate guide to the best books of 2018.

To put 2019 into perspective, these are the fears and hopes about 2019 from 105 experts.

 

Mental energizer

With phones that are more reliable, have fewer changes every year, and are increasingly expensive, you should treat your phone like a car. If some jerk clips off your side-view mirror while you’re parked and doesn’t leave a note, you don’t trash your car and get a new one — you get a new side-view mirror. If you crack your phone’s screen, don’t get a new phone, get a new screen.

And when your phone truly does run its course, whether because you simply want something newer and faster, or your old phone has finally stopped working, consider avoiding the newest phone on the market. Relatively few people buy new cars, because it doesn’t make much sense financially. Instead, most people, even those with who could buy new, buy a used car.

– From “We’re No Longer in Smartphone Plateau. We’re in the Smartphone Decline” from the Intelligencer

 

Food for thought (?)

Cute Aggression

The feeling of experiencing cuteness sends many people on a neurochemical roller coaster, with their minds’ attempts to balance themselves resulting in bizarre, intense displays toward tiny, helpless beings.

 

This week’s exploration of possible futures was curated with curiosity by Iñaki Escudero, Future Activist.

Click here to share Changes of Tomorrow with a friend or co-worker.

 

 

Photo by Trust “Tru” Katsande on Unsplash